Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Reasoning with Numbers

Handwerker, W. Penn & Borgatti, Stephen P. (1998)

H. R. Bernard (Ed.), Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology, pp. 549-593. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press.

Presents a comprehensive set of techniques for representing the world through numbers and argues that there are many things to be missed when neglecting these approaches. With a focus on “answering research questions,” the authors weave this presentation into a discussion of perspective and methodological decisions from various fields. Finishes with specific illustrations for many techniques and how the particular approach can move your research forward.
Sociology Based Publications

Systematic Field Observation

McCall, George J. (1984)

Annual Review of Sociology, 10: 263-282

Discusses the history and types of field observation methods from a sociological perspective. Offers a role-expectations view of observation systems requiring a reconceptualization of system development and the nature, sources, and management of error.
Sociology Based Publications

Content Analysis of Words in Brief Descriptions: How Mothers and Fathers Describe their Children

Ryan, Gery, & Weisner, Thomas S. (1998)

V. de Munck and E. Sobo (Eds.), Using methods in the field. A practical introduction and casebook, pp. 57-68

Content analysis of parent descriptions of their children toward understanding parental perceptions and attitudes regarding their adolescent children. The data for this article comes from a follow-up survey in the Family Lifestyles Project - a 20-year long longitudinal study of conventional and non-conventional families in the United States.
Education Based Publications

Behavior Sampling and Ethnography: Complementary Methods for Understanding Home-School Connections Among Latino Immigrant Families

Weisner, T. S., Ryan, G., Reese, L., Kroesen, K., Bernheimer, L., and Gallimore, R. (2001)

Field Methods, 13(1): 20-46

Used ethnography and experience-sampling methods to study the relations between home activities and school achievement in a sample of low-income Latino immigrant families and their 10-11 year-old children at risk for low school achievement. Both ethnography and experience-sampling methods (ESMs) are effective for assessing children’s home activities. The authors combined them to examine home activities that were school-like, complementary to school, or unrelated to school.
Sociology Based Publications

Using Consensus Analysis to Measure Cultural Diversity in Organizations and Social Movements

Caulkins, Douglas & Hyatt, Susan B. (1999)

Field Methods, 11(1): 55-26

Introduces consensus analysis as useful technique for analyzing structured interview data and producing results that: a) measure the degree of agreement amont informants, b) identify "culturally correct" information, and c) assign scores for each informant on how knowledgeble they are with respect to the "correct" response.
Education Based Publications

Pragmatism and the Choice of Research Strategy

Tashakkori, Abbas & Teddlie, Charles (1998)

A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie, Mixed Methodology: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 3-19.

Introduces and traces the history of the methodological paradigm wars and brings readers up to the state of affairs (albeit, 1998). Discuss the ‘warring’ positions and the evolution of thinking regarding pragmatism and the development of mixed methods approaches to social science research.
Sociology Based Publications

The Mixed Methods Reader

Plano Clark, V. L., & Creswell, J. W. (2008)

Los Angeles: Sage

In recent years, researchers have begun to combine quantitative and qualitative approaches within single study research designs. As such, the literature on mixed methods research has grown at a rapid pace. While more methodological books addressing mixed methods are becoming available, the foundational writings of this field are still scattered across diverse disciplines and their wide range of publications outlets, leaving students and researchers at a disadvantage to find the exemplary or model studies to help them understand how to conduct their own mixed methods research. In light of the dispersed nature of the mixed methods literature, The Mixed Methods Reader editors have organized a collection of key methodological mixed methods discussions and exemplar mixed methods research studies in one easy-to-access location. This integrative collection draws from the international literature appearing across diverse research disciplines over the past thirty years. The Mixed Methods Reader is divided into two parts: Part I – Methodological Selections and Part II – Exemplar Research Studies. Part I includes a collection of 14 foundational writings from the mixed methods research literature. These readings convey the overall development and evolution of mixed methods research and address essential topics for researchers new to the field of mixed methods research. These topics include its foundations; design types; implementation issues such as sampling, data analysis, and validity; rhetorical devices for reporting mixed methods studies; and critiques about the current thinking in the field. Part II includes 9 exemplar mixed methods research studies drawn from a range of disciplines and international scholars. The studies were intentionally selected to illustrate four major types of mixed methods designs. As with the methodological chapters, the editors organize the exemplar research studies so that the reader can see a natural progression of the different approaches to conducting mixed methods research. The Mixed Methods Reader, edited by two leading researchers in mixed methods research, offers students and researchers a rich balance of foundational works and exemplary studies across a range of disciplines. This reader is an invaluable primary or supplementary resource for courses that address mixed methods research. Key Features: Each of the 14 foundational readings offers a brief introduction by the editors, discussing the reading's overall importance to mixed methods research and explaining what aspect of the research process is addressed. The foundational readings are organized around the research process to facilitate its use as a text or supplement for research courses emphasizing mixed methods approaches. They cover research design types and purposes, data collection, data analysis, reporting of mixed methods studies, and future directions. Each of the 9 exemplary studies include a brief commentary from the editors, highlighting the noteworthy features of the article. These exemplary studies range in discipline and setting yet focus intently on the research process and the various ways of conducting mixed methods studies. Visual diagrams accompany each exemplary study: These visual diagrams will convey the overall structure and approach used in each of the studies. Discussion questions accompanying each selection further call attention to the key points and help a student or individual researcher to tie together the core concepts presented in the commentaries and articles.
Education Based Publications

Sampling

Trochin, M. K. (2006)

Introduction and discussion of various sampling approaches
Education Based Publications

Developing Data Analysis

Silverman, David (2005)

Doing Qualitative Research, 2nd Edition (pp. 171-187)

Provides a step-by-step guide to all the questions students ask when beginning their first research project. Silverman demonstrates how to learn the craft of qualitative research by applying knowledge about different methods to actual data. He provides practical advice on key issues such as defining ‘originality’ and narrowing down a topic, keeping a research diary and writing a research report, and presenting research to different audiences.
Education Based Publications

A Framework for the Study

Creswell, John W. (1994)

J. W. Creswell, Research Design: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 1-19.

How do you decide whether to use a qualitative or a quantitative approach for the design of a research study? How do you write up the results of a study for a scholarly journal article or dissertation? This book addresses these issues by providing a guide to major design decisions, such as deciding a paradigm, stating a purpose for the study, identifying the research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining and stating the significance of the study. Research Design is aimed at upper division to graduate level research methods courses that are taught to prepare students to plan and write up independent research studies. In the past two decades, research approaches have multiplied to a point at which investigators or inquirers have many choices. For those designing a proposal or plan, I recommend that a general framework be adopted to provide guidance about all facets of the study, from assessing the general philosophical ideas behind the inquiry to the detailed data collection and analysis procedures. Using an extant framework also allows researchers to lodge their plans in ideas well grounded in the literature and recognized by audiences (e.g., faculty committees) that read and support proposals for research. What frameworks exist for designing a proposal? Although different types and terms abound In the literature, I will focus on three: quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches. 'The first has been available to the social and human scientist for years, the second has emerged primarily during the last three or four decades, and the last is new and still developing in form and substance. This chapter introduces the reader to the three approaches to research. I suggest that to understand them, the proposal developer needs to consider three framework elements: philosophical assumptions about what constltutes knowledge claims; general procedures of research called strategies of inquhy and detailed procedures of data collection, analysis, and writing. called methods. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches frame each of these elements differently, and these diefences are identified and discussed in this chapter. 'Then typical scenarios that combine the three elements are advanced, followed by the reasons why one would choose one approach over another in designing a study. 'This discussion will not be a philosophical treatise on the nature of knowledge, but it will provide a practical grounding in some of the philosophical ideas behind research.
31-40 of 53