Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Advances in mixed methods research

Bergman, M. M (2008)

London: Sage

Advances in Mixed Methods Research provides an essential introduction to the fast-growing field of mixed methods research. Bergman's book examines the current state of mixed-methods research, exploring exciting new ways of conceptualizing and conducting empirical research in the social and health sciences. Illuminating new ways of conceptualizing and conducting empirical research in the social sciences and humanities, this book contains contributions from some of the world's leading experts on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. The contributions cover all of the main practical and methodological issues and represent a number of different visions of what mixed methods research is and where it is going. Contributions from the world's leading experts in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches are brought together, clearing the way for a more constructive approach to social research. These contributions cover the main practical and methodological issues and include a number of different visions of what mixed methods research is. The discussion also covers the use of mixed methods in a diverse range of fields, including sociology, education, politics, psychology, computational science and methodology. This book represents an important contribution to the ongoing debate surrounding the use of mixed methods in the social sciences and health research, and presents a convincing argument that the conventional, paradigmatic view of qualitative and quantitative research is outdated and in need of replacement. It will be essential reading for anyone actively engaged in qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research and for students of social research methods. Manfred Max Bergman is Chair of Methodology and Political Sociology at the University of Basel. Very good text wherein the mixed methods approach is coherently developed and its current (and potential) applications are described in clear, useful and interesting ways. I particularly liked the depth of understanding with Bergman demonstrating subtle implications of the advances. For the undergraduate level, I felt this was perhaps too advanced but well worth a read if the mixed methods approach is adopted. Mr Paul Buckley Nursing , Bradford University
Education Based Publications

Qualitative and Quantitative Methods

Bernard, H. Russell & Ryan, Gery W. (1998)

Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology, pp. 595-646. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press

Complete presentation and discussion of steps and strategies for analyzing text from a variety of qualitative research orientations
Education Based Publications

Toward a Definition of Mixed Methods Research

Johnson, R. Burke, Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J., & Turner, Lisa A. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(2), 112-133

Examines the definition of the emerging mixed methods research field. Surveyed major authors in the mixed method literature with regard to definition for the field and key issues that need to be addressed as the field advances. Results show a consensus of mixed methods as an emerging ‘research paradigm’ and a breadth of opinion around definition for the field.
Education Based Publications

Focus Groups

Morgan, David L. (2004)

S. N. Hesse-Biber and P. Leavy (Eds.), Approaches to Qualitative Research: A Reader on Theory and Practice, pp. 263-285. New York, NY: Oxford University Press

Written by a long-time authority on focus group, presents a brief history of focus group application up to, and including, information on the variety of current uses across many disciplines. Great section on the uses of focus groups in combination with other methods with a full compare/contrast discussion. Finally, goes into the specifics on ‘how to’ plan and conduct effective group data collection. My own preference (Morgan, 1996) is for a more inclusive approach that broadly defines focus groups as a research technique that collects data through group interaction on a topic determined by the researcher. In essence, it is the researcher's interest that provides the focus, whereas the data themselves come from the group interaction. One reason for favoring an inclusive approach is that the exclusive approaches do not really exclude very much. Other than focus groups, the primary categories of group interviews in the existing typologies are things that are manifestly different from focus groups. On the one hand, there are nominal groups and Delphi groups (Stewart & Shamdasani, 1990), which do not involve actual group interaction. On the other hand, there is the observation of naturally occurring groups, which typically do not involve the researcher in determining the topic of discussion. Thus, little is gained by excluding these categories of data collection because they already fall outside the broad definition of focus groups offered here. Among the more specific criteria that could be used to distinguish focus groups from other types of group interviews, both Frey and Fontana (1989) and Khan and Manderson (1992) assert that focus groups are more formal. In particular, they argue that focus groups are likely to involve inviting participants to the discussion and they also stress the distinctive role of the moderator. Although there is no doubt that group interviews vary along a continuum from more formally structured interaction to more informal gatherings, I do not believe it is possible to draw a line between formal and informal group interviews in a way that defines some as focus groups and others as something else. Instead, I find it more useful to think that the degree of formal structure in a focus group is a decision that the research makes according to the specific purposes of the research project. In par-ticular, the use of either a more formal or a less formal approach will depend on the researcher's goals, the nature of the research setting, and the likely reaction of the participants to the research topic. Among the other criteria that have been offered as distinguishing features of focus groups are their size and the use of specialized facilities for the interview (McQuarrie, 1996). Again, however, these supposedly exclu¬sive criteria are mostly a matter of degree. Who is to say when a group is too large or too small to be called a focus group or when a setting is too casual to qualify? Rather than generate pointless debates about what is or is not a focus group, I prefer to treat focus groups as a "broad umbrella" or "big tent" that can include many different variations. Of course, this approach requires researchers to make choices about doing focus groups one way rather than another. Fortunately, this need to make explicit decisions about data collection strategies is a familiar concern to social scientists, and it comes under the heading of "research design." As social scientists have gained increasing experience with focus groups, we also have produced insights into the situations in which different research designs are either more or less likely to be effective (e.g., Krueger, 1993; Morgan, 1992.a, 1995).
Education Based Publications

A Typology of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social Science Research

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Collins, K. M. T. (2007)

The Qualitative Report, 12(2), 281-316

Introduces a framework for developing sampling designs in mixed methods research. Discusses sample frames, recommended sample sizes, a typology for classification of strategies, guidance for sampling decisions, and issues related to how sampling decisions impact generalization.
Education Based Publications

Research Design Issues for Mixed Method and Mixed Model Studies

Tashakkori, Abbas & Teddlie, Charles (1998)

A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie, Mixed Methodology: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 40-58

Discusses the concept of triangulation from various perspectives and the variety of approaches to implementing mixed methods research. Builds on Patton’s (1990) discussion of ‘mixed form’ design to a broader model in order to develop a taxonomy for distinguishing various mixed method designs and approaches.
Sociology Based Publications

Qualitative Data Analysis

Seidel, John V. (1998)

Qualis Research

This is an essay on the basic processes in qualitative and mixed methods data analysis (QDA). It serves two purposes. It is a simple introduction for the newcomer of QDA. QDA is a process of noticing, collecting and thinking about interesting things. The purpose of this model is to show that there is asimple foundation to the complex and rigorous practice of QDA. Once you grasp this foundation you can move in many different directions. The idea for this model came from a conversation with one of my former teachers, Professor Ray Cuzzort. Ray was teaching an undergraduate statistics course and wanted to boil down the complexity of statistics to a simple model. His solution was to tell the students that statistics was a symphony based on two notes: means and standard deviations. I liked the simplicity and elegance of his formulation and decided to try and come up with a similar idea for describing QDA. The result was the idea that QDA is a symphony based on three notes: Noticing, Collecting, and Thinkingabout interesting things. While there is great diversity in the practice of QDA I would argue that all forms of QDA are based on these three “notes.” The QDA process is not linear. When you do QDA you do not simply Notice, Collect, and then Think about things, and then write a report. Rather, the process has the following characteristics: -Iterative and Progressive: The process is iterative and progressive because it is a cycle that keeps repeating. For example, when you are thinking about things you also start noticing new things in the data. You then collect and think about these new things. In principle the process is an infinite spiral. -Recursive: The process is recursive because one part can call you back to a previous part. For example, while you are busy collecting things you might simultaneously start noticing new things to collect. -Holographic: The process is holographic in that each step in the process contains the entire process. For example, when you first notice things you are already mentally collecting and thinking about those things. Thus, while there is a simple foundation to QDA, the process of doing qualitative data analysis is complex. The key is to root yourself in this foundation and the rest will flow from this foundation.
Sociology Based Publications

The Integration of Fieldwork and Survey Methods

Sieber, Sam (1973)

American Journal of Sociology, 78(6): 1335-1359

A historical antagonism between the proponents of qualitative fieldwork and of survey research has prevented recognition of the benefits to be gained by employing both methods in the same study. Each method can be greatly strenthenedby appealing to the unique qualities of the other. Through examination of a number of cases in which the methods have been integrated, it is possible to discern important benefits is design, data collection, and analysis. In order tofully exploit the advantages of integration, however, adjustments in traditional procedures will have to be made, thereby yielding a new style of social research. Others citing this work make clear and strong arguments for the value of work emerging under the frame of 'mixed methods research.' As found in Christense, Robinson, and Simons, 2016 'The Application of Mixed Methods: using a Crossover Analysis Strategy for Product Developement in Real Estate,' 'Although the definition of mixed methods research still remains a contested area, most researchers agree that mixed methods research combines qualitative and quantitative data collection and data analysis within a single study (Johnson & Onwuegbuzie, 2004; Teddlie & Tashakkori, 2003) to better understand research problems by enabling breadth and depth of understanding and corroboration' (Johnson, Onwuegbuzie and Turner, 2007: 56). The mixed methods movement is gaining popularity in many disciplines (Patton, 1990; Tashakkori & Teddlie, 2003) and, emphasizing the value and advantages of mixed methods research, the integration of quantitative and qualitative research methods has been made in sociology (Sieber, 1973), education evaluation (Cook & Reichardt, 1979; Greene, Caracelli, & Graham, 1989; Rossman & Wilson, 1985), health sciences (O'Cathain, 2009), sustainable tourism (McGehee et al, 2013), and management and organizational research (Aguinis et al., 2010; Currall & Towler, 2003; Edmondson & McManus, 2007; Molina-Azorin, 2012). The rise in uptake may be due in part to the methodological pluralism, which frequently results in a better understanding of research problems than a mono-method design (Molina-Azorin, 2012). ABSTRACT: Increasingly, researchers are recognizing the benefits of expanding research designs to include both quantitative and qualitative methods to gain deeper insight into the reasons behind various research phenomena. Entrepreneurial development of market oriented products can benefit from the use of both methods to gain an understanding of complex issues influencing the development of new products. This research offers a philosophical argument for utilizing a mixed methods approach in the development of quantitative instruments and demonstrates how the use of a crossover analysis strategy expands the traditionally applied, linear decision process to improve both the fidelity and validity of market-driven products. The research then demonstrates how a mixed methods crossover analysis strategy enables both quantitative and qualitative data to iteratively inform the revisions, adaptation and development of a (quantitative) market-oriented product.
Education Based Publications

Integrating Data Analysis in Mixed Methods Research

Bazeley, Patricia (2009)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 3(3), 203-207

Encourages a thinking about mixed methods work based on a qualitative-quantitative continuum. Focuses primarily on strategy for mixed methods data analysis at various stages of the process rather than just integration at the end. Discusses the use of computer solutions to assist in the process. Although the epistemological arguments of the "paradigm wars" sharpened our thinking about issues related to mixed methodology, their lingering legacy has been to slow the progress of integration methods.
Education Based Publications

A Systems Approach to Qualitative Data Management and Analysis

MacQueen, Kathleen M. & Milstein, Bobby (1999)

Field Methods, 11(1): 27-39

Introduces and illustrates a systematic approach to qualitative data management from a database architecture perspective. Discusses four main types of information collected in qualitative research: information about primary sources, information from primary sources, secondary information generated by coders, and information about the coders and how quantitative approaches can be used to evaluate qualitative analysis.
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