Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Advanced Mixed Methods Research Design

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2002)

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publication, In A. Tahakkori and C. Teddlie (Eds), Handbook of Mixed Methods Research Designs, pp. 209-239

Describes variety of mixed methods research designs and associated analytical issues. Related work: Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach Nancy L. Leech, Amy B. Dellinger, Kim B. Brannagan and Hideyuki Tanaka4 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are evaluated. The three mixed research studies differed in design and implementation. Elements of the VF were examined and evaluated for each study, and a picture of the quality of each study was captured textually. In presenting the VF and its potential for practical application in evaluating mixed research studies, pragmatic researchers can use this tool to increase the quality of their evaluations of mixed research studies. Implementing Quality Criteria in Designing and Conducting a Sequential QUAN → QUAL Mixed Methods Study of Student Engagement With Learning Applied Research Methods Online Nataliya V. Ivankova In spite of recent methodological developments related to quality assurance in mixed methods research, practical examples of how to implement quality criteria in designing and conducting sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods studies to ensure the process is systematic and rigorous remain scarce. This article discusses a three-step procedure for securing the quality of the meta-inferences generated from sequential employment of quantitative and qualitative methods and offers several validation strategies specific to a sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods design: applying a systematic process for selecting participants for qualitative follow-up, elaborating on unexpected quantitative results, and observing interaction between qualitative and quantitative study strands. The discussed procedures are illustrated using a mixed methods study of graduate student engagement in learning applied research methods online.
Education Based Publications

Validity and Reliability of Qualitative Data Analysis: Interobserver Agreement in Reconstructing Interpretative Frames

Moret, Margriet, Reuzel, Rob, Van Der Wilt, Gert J. & Grin, John (2007)

Field Methods, 19(1): 24-39

Many authors have discussed criteria for assessing the quality of qualitative and mixed methods studies in the social sciences. However, relatively few have presented the results of using criteria for validity of qualitative studies. We investigated the quality of reconstructing interpretative frames, a method for analyzing interview transcripts. The aim of this method is to describe a person's perspective, distinguishing between perceived problem definitions, proposed solutions, empirical background theories, and normative preferences. Based on this description, one should be able to estimate this person's cooperation on implementing specific changes in his or her practice. In this article, we assessed the interobserver reliability of this analytical method as an indicator of its rigor. Six analysts reconstructed interpretative frames on the basis of verbatim transcripts of three interviews. The analysts agreed only moderately about the issues identified and which problems should be prioritized. However, they showed remarkable unanimity as to the estimates of the respondents' cooperation on proposed solutions.
Education Based Publications

Harnessing experience: exploring the gap between evidence-based medicine and clinical practice

M. Cameron Hay, et all (2008)

Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

Harnessing experience: exploring the gap between evidence-based medicine and clinical practice
Sociology Based Publications

Dimensions of Desire: Bridging Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in a Study of Female Adolescent Sexuality

Tolman, Deborah L. & Szalacha, Laura A. (1999)

Psychology of Women Quarterly, 23: 7-39

This study provides an example of how feminist psychology can bridge qualitative and quantitative methods while keeping lived experience at the center of an inquiry. Illustrates how feminist psychology research can bridge qual and quant methods while keeping lived experience as the center of inquiry. A qualitative analyis of interview data is distinguised via quant methods to explore differences in urban and suburban experiences with respect to reported sexual violation. A second qual approach more deeply explores the interaction of location reported violation.
Policy Based Publications

Impacts of Children with Troubles on Working Poor Families: Experimental and Mixed Methods Evidence

Bernheimer, L., Weisner, T.S., & Lowe, E. (2003)

Mental Retardation, 41(6): 403-419

Mixed-method and experimental data on working poor families and children with troubles participating in the New Hope anti-poverty experimental initiative in Milwaukee are described. Sixty percent of these families had at least one child who had significant problems (learning, school achievement and/or behavior, home behavior, retardation, other disabilities). Control group familieswith children who had troubles had more difficulties in sustaining their family routine than did New Hope experimental families.
Education Based Publications

Students' Perceptions of Characteristics of Effective College Teachers: A Validity Study of a Teaching Evaluation Form Using a Mixed Methods Analysis

Onwuegbuzie, A. J., Witcher, A. E., Collins, K. M. T., Filer, J. D., Wiedmaier, C. D., & Moore, C. W. (2007)

American Educational Research Journal, 44(1): 113-160

This study used a multistage mixed-methods analysis to assess the content-related validity (i.e., item validity, sampling validity) and construct-related validity (i.e., substantive validity, structural validity, outcome validity, generalizability) of a teaching evaluation form (TEF) by examining students’ perceptions of characteristics of effective college teachers. Participants were 912 undergraduate and graduate students (10.7% of student body) from various academic majors enrolled at a public university. A sequential mixed-methods analysis led to the development of the CARE-RESPECTED Model of Teaching Evaluation, which represented characteristics that students considered to reflect effective college teaching—comprising four meta-themes (communicator, advocate, responsible, empowering) and nine themes (responsive, enthusiast, student centered, professional, expert, connector, transmitter, ethical, and director). Three of the most prevalent themes were not represented by any of the TEF items; also, endorsement of most themes varied by student attribute (e.g., gender, age), calling into question the content- and construct-related validity of the TEF scores. Also cited by Harris, Ingle, Rutledge, 2014, 'How Teacher Evaluation Methods Matter for Accountability A Comparative Analysis of Teacher Effectiveness Ratings by Principals and Teacher Value-Added Measures.' Abstract Policymakers are revolutionizing teacher evaluation by attaching greater stakes to student test scores and observation-based teacher effectiveness measures, but relatively little is known about why they often differ so much. Quantitative analysis of thirty schools suggests that teacher value-added measures and informal principal evaluations are positively, but weakly, correlated. Qualitative analysis suggests that some principals give high value-added teachers low ratings because the teachers exert too little effort and are “lone wolves” who work in isolation and contribute little to the school community. The results suggest that the method of evaluation may not only affect which specific teachers are rewarded in the short term, but shape the qualities of teacher and teaching students experience in the long term.
Sociology Based Publications

Children of the 1960s at Midlife: Generational Identity and the Family Adaptive Project

Weisner, T. S., & Bernheimer, L. P. (1998)

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, In R. Shweder (Ed.), Welcome to middle age! and Other Cultural Fictions, pp. 211-257

Many of us believe we recognize the symptoms of middle age: lower back pain, mortgages, and an aversion to loud late-night activities. This particular construction of midlife, most often rendered in chronological, biological, and medical terms, has become an accepted reality to European-Americans and has recently spread to such non-Western capitals as Tokyo and New Delhi. Welcome to Middle Age! (And Other Cultural Fictions) explores the significance of this pervasive cultural representation alongside the alternative "fictions" that represent the life course in other regions of the world where middle age does not exist. In this volume, anthropologists, behavioral scientists, and historians explore topics ranging from the Western ideology of "midlife decline" to cultural representations of mature adulthood that operate without the category of middle age. The result is a fascinating, panoramic collection that explores the myths surrounding and the representations of mature adulthood and of those years in the life span from thirty to seventy. Weisner and Bernheimer on the use of qualitative, ethnography and mixed methods chapter on describing the outcomes of a counter-culture group of the 1960s who had been studied longitudinally with attention to their childrearing practices, lifestyle, and children's later social and psychological adaptation.
Education Based Publications

Focus Groups

Morgan, David L. (2004)

S. N. Hesse-Biber and P. Leavy (Eds.), Approaches to Qualitative Research: A Reader on Theory and Practice, pp. 263-285. New York, NY: Oxford University Press

Written a long-time authority on focus group, presents a brief history of focus group application up to, and including, information on the variety of current uses across many disciplines. Great section on the uses of focus groups in combination with other methods with a full compare/contrast discussion. Finally, goes into the specifics on ‘how to’ plan and conduct effective group data collection.
Sociology Based Publications

Cultural Consensus as a Statistical Model

Romney, A. Kimball (1999)

Current Anthropology, 40 (Supplement), S103-S115.

Discusses history, theory, and strategy for the use of statistical models in the discovery of cultural consensus. Introduces issues related to data collection strategy and the use of empirical data to identify and represent cultural characteristics.
Education Based Publications

Scientific Foundations of Qualitative Research

Ragin, Charles C., Nagel, Joane, & White, Patricia (2004)

National Science Foundation Report

Report generated by a NSF workshop on qualitative research methods. Two main sections: 1) provide a general guidance for developing qualitative research project and 2) recommendations for strengthening qualitative research. This report is organized into two major sections — general guidance for developing qualitative research projects and recommendations for strengthening qualitative research. The intent of the first section of the report is to serve as a primer to guide both investigators developing qualitative proposals and reviewers evaluating qualitative research projects. The second section of the report presents workshop recommendations for designing, evaluating, supporting, and strengthening qualitative research.
81-90 of 100