Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Text Analysis - Qualitative and Quantitative Methods

H Russell Bernard, Gery W. Ryan (1998)

Education Based Publications

Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Research: How is it Done?

Bryman, Alan (2006)

Qualitative Research, 6(1), 97-113

Draws on a content analysis of methods and design from 232 articles using combined methods. Examine and discusses the rationales provide for employing mixed-methods and whether they correspond to actual practice.
Education Based Publications

A Mixed Methods Investigation of Mixed Methods Sampling Designs in Social and Health Science Research

Collins, Kathleen M. T., Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J., & Jiao, Qun G. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(3), 267-294

Presents a two-dimensional model (time orientation—concurrent vs. sequential and the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative samples—identical, nested, multilevel, and parallel) for classifying mixed methods studies sampling designs. Presents and discusses findings from the distribution of 121 studies into the model and the relative appropriateness of the employed strategy.
Geography Based Publications

Using GPS and geo-narratives: a methodological approach for understanding and situating everyday green space encounters

Sarah L Bell, Cassandra Phoenix, Rebecca Lovell, Benedict W Wheeler (2015)

This methods paper contributes to the recent proliferation of methodological innovation aimed at nurturing research encounters and exchanges that facilitate in-depth insights into people's everyday practices and routine place encounters. By drawing on the experiences of an interpretive study seeking to situate people's green space wellbeing practices within their daily lives, we suggest value in using personalised maps – produced using participant accelerometer (physical activity) and Global Positioning System (GPS) data – alongside in-depth and mobile ‘go-along’ qualitative interview approaches. After introducing the study and the methods adopted, the paper discusses three opportunities offered by this mixed method approach to contribute a more nuanced, contextualised understanding of participants' green space experiences. These include: (a) the benefits of engaging participants in the interpretation of their own practices; (b) the value of using maps to provide a visual aid to discussion about the importance of participants' routine, often pre-reflective practices; and (c) the production of a layered appreciation of participants' local green and blue space wellbeing experiences. Used in combination, such methods have the potential to provide a more comprehensive picture of how current green space experiences, be they infrequent and meaningful, or more routine and habitual, are shaped by everyday individual agency, life circumstances and past place experiences.
Education Based Publications

Using Pooled Kappa to Summarize Interrater Agreement across Many Items

Han De Vries, Marc N. Elliott, David E. Kanouse, and Stephanie S. Teleki (2008)

In this article researchers propose the pooled estimator of kappa, an efficient estimator when summarizing the interrater agreement for qualitative data with many items but few subjects. They also evaluate this estimator through a simulation of proposed and alternative (average kappa) estimators and subsequently apply their method to calculate pooled and average kappas over 2,176 rated items from six semistructured interviews with sponsors of the CAHPS. The proposed pooled kappa estimator efficiently summarizes interrater agreement by domain. It is more widely applicable and makes better use of scarce subjects than simply averaging item-level kappas. Dedoose makes use of the Pooled Kappa statistic explained here for the Training Center function that allows users to calculate inter rater reliability.
Medical Based Publications

The Meaning of Kappa: Probabilistic Concepts of Reliability and Validity Revisited

Guggenmoos-Holzmann, Irene (1996)

Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 49(7): 775-782

A Framework—the “agreement concept”—is developed to study the use of Cohen's kappa as well as alternative measures of chance-corrected agreement in a unified manner for qualitative and mixed methods research. Focusing on intrarater consistency it is demonstrated that for 2 × 2 tables an adequate choice between different measures of chance-corrected agreement can be made only if the characteristics of the observational setting are taken into account. In particular, a naive use of Cohen's kappa may lead to strinkingly overoptimistic estimates of chance-corrected agreement. Such bias can be overcome by more elaborate study designs that allow for an unrestricted estimation of the probabilities at issue. When Cohen's kappa is appropriately applied as a measure of chance-corrected agreement, its values prove to be a linear—and not a parabolic—function of true prevalence. It is further shown how the validity of ratings is influenced by lack of consistency. Depending on the design of a validity study, this may lead, on purely formal grounds, to prevalence-dependent estimates of sensitivity and specificity. Proposed formulas for “chance-corrected” validity indexes fail to adjust for this phenomenon. It is common practice to assess consistency of diagnostic ratings in terms of 'agreement beyond chance'. To explore the interpretation of such a term we consider relevant statistical techniques such as Cohen's kappa and log-linear models for agreement on nominal ratings. We relate these approaches to a special latent class concept that decomposes observed ratings into a class of systematically consistent and a class of fortuitous ratings. This decomposition provides a common framework in which the specific premises of Cohen's kappa and of log-linear models can be identified and put into perspective. As a result it is shown that Cohen's kappa may be an inadequate and biased index of chance-corrected agreement in studies of intra-observer as well as inter-observer consistency. We suggest a more critical use and interpretation of measures gauging observer reliability by the amount of agreement beyond chance.
Geography Based Publications

Evaluating Qualitative Research in Social Geography: Establishing ‘Rigour’ in Interview Analysis

Baxter, Jamie; Eyles, John (1997)

A review of 31 empirical and 18 substantive papers by qualitative social geographers mainly using in-depth interviews reveals little explicit reference to the principle(s) adopted to enhance ‘rigour’ and to ensure meaningful inference. Given the modest explicit discussion of evaluative criteria in these papers, a scheme from evaluation research itself is critically reviewed. A set of evaluation questions derived from this review and their application to an empirical piece of qualitative work frame an argument for a general set of criteria rather than rigid rules for assessing qualitative work. Such criteria can serve as anchor points for qualitative evaluation.
Education Based Publications

Beliefs About Treatment of Mental Health Problem Among Cambodian American Children and Parents

Daley, Tamara (2005)

Social Science & Medicine

Geography Based Publications

Interviews and Questionnaires as Mixed Methods in Population Geography: TheCase of Lone Fathers in Newcastle, Australia

Winchester, Hilary P.M (1999)

A mixed method approach was adopted to study the experiences of lone fathers, using a classic triangulation approach of interview and questionnaire data. This study utilised an empirical realist framework of scientific inquiry, with the ‘soft’ individual interview data seen as an adjunct to the ‘hard’ aggregate quantitative methods. A review of this study found that the interviews worked well as a pilot study in a classic mixed methods framework. The questionnaires provided a range of information about the characteristics of this group of lone fathers, but it was the interviews which provided astonishing depth on the causes of marital breakdown and post-marital conflict, and on the discourses and other structures which sustain social processes. In this study, the interview techniques could have been used differently, in a different framework of analysis (that of critical rather than empirical realism) without the support of other mixed methods.
Geography Based Publications

Health geography II ‘Dividing’ health geography

Rosenberg, Mark (2015)

Over the years, various observers of health geography have sought to ‘divide’ the sub-discipline mainly along theoretical lines or to argue for a broadening of its theoretical base. Paralleling the growing theoretical pluralism within health geography has been a growing methodological pluralism. As in other parts of human geography, health geographers have embraced historical research, quantitative and qualitative methods, and computer mapping and geographic information science (GIS). Analyzing recent contributions by health geographers, the question I seek to answer is whether the growing theoretical and methodological pluralism has paradoxically led to increasing divisions in the topics of study based mainly, but not solely, on what methods are employed in the research. While there are topical overlaps (e.g. quantitative and qualitative studies of particular vulnerable groups), it is less obvious as to how research using one methodology is informing research using the other methodology.
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