Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Sociology Based Publications

Why Ethnography Should be the Most Important Method in the Study of Human Development

Weisner, Thomas S. (1996)

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, In Jessor, R., Colby, A., and Shweder, R., (Eds.). Ethnography and human development. Context and meaning in social inquiry, pp. 305-324

The recognition of the cultural place as a powerfully important influence in development immediately suggests that there is no "one" important thing, and that development is multiply determined in cultural context. All of the influences which usually come to mind are important in every cultural place. Developmentally sensitive and appropriate interac¬tions are indeed crucial, ,for example, but the existence of those dyadic interactions is due to 'the 'everyday cultural routine of life and to shared understandings which surround and scaffold them. Self-understanding and esteem are important as well, but culturally provided settings and their meanings make these possible. Attachment and trust are important, but how do infants and Children experience strangers and learn whom to trust? Ethnography brings the importance of the cultural place to the center of attention, transforming it from ground to figure. An important goal of ethnographic research is to describe and understand the cultural place and its influence on the everyday lives of its members. Whatever one's opinions are about epistemological and methodological concerns regarding ethnographically derived knowledge (and there surely are such concerns, as for all methods), the remarkable findings from ethnographic work re¬garding the varying cultural tools children use to develop in cultural places throughout the world alone provide sufficient reason for ethnography's deep incorporation into developmental work. The chapters in this section offer interesting findings and their own models for how to integrate ethnography into developmental research. My comments on the chapters take advantage of their work to develop some general points about fieldwork and ethnography. First and foremost, eth¬nography and fieldwork get the researcher out into the cultural place of children and families. Once there, many ways of doing ethnography are possible and are illustrated in these chapters. Second, "methodocentrism,” the exclusive use of one method and fear of others, should be resisted as illustrated by these chapters. It is not plausible that any important question in developmental studies can be answered with a single method. Ethnography can and should be complementary with other methods. I suggest a way to talk about research methods different than the iconic qualitative/quantitative contrast, which seems to encourage polarizing discourse and is in any case not very useful or accurate. Third, ethnography is not limited only to early exploratory stages of research and to description of local meanings. It can and should be question driven; it provides valid evidence to test against our models of the world; and it produces findings, as these chapters demonstrate. Next, I suggest that ethnography is to the developmental sciences as siblings or cousins are to one another—a part of the same broad lineage in the naturalistic traditions of the social sciences. John Modell imagines ethnography and development as two fascinated and mutually dangerous lovers. Both metaphors are probably appropriate at times. Finally, I suggest that a number of salutary things would happier if fieldwork in another cultural place, like learning statistics, was a normal, expected part of every developmentalist's qualitative and mixed methods research training.
Education Based Publications

Mixed Methods Analysis and Information Visualization: Graphical Display for Effective Communication of Research Results

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Dickinson, W. B. (2008)

The Qualitative Report, 13(2), 204-225

Introduces a range of graphical methods that can be used to present mixed methods research results. Presents a taxonomy for the presentation of results in general (quan or qual) and then strategy for integrating qual-quant results in same framework. Frist, we present a broad taxonomy of visual representation. Next, we use this taxonomy to provide and overview of visual techniques for quantitative data display and qualitative data display. Then, we propose what we call "crossover" visual extensions to summarize and integrate both qualitative and quantitative results within the same framework.
Medical Based Publications

"I speak a different dialect": Teen Explanatory Models of Difference and Disability

Daley, Tamara, & Weisner, Thomas S. (2003)

Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 17(1): 25-48

fter eras of “blaming” parents for their children’s disabilities and relying on biomedical labels as both correct and sufficient to explain and name various conditions, research and practice today recognize the significance of the meaning and understanding of disabilities held by family members and children themselves. What do teens with disabilities believe about their circumstances, and what do they understand to be the causes, correlates, and consequences of their conditions? Elicited explanatory models from adolescents with varied cognitive disabilities and delay to better understand their personal experiences
Medical Based Publications

A cross-sectional mixed methods study protocol to generate learning from patient safety incidents reported from general practice

Carson-Stevens et al (2015)

Incident reports contain descriptions of errors and harms that occurred during clinical care delivery. Few observational studies have characterised incidents from general practice, and none of these have been from the England and Wales National Reporting and Learning System. This study aims to describe incidents reported from a general practice care setting. A general practice patient safety incident classification will be developed to characterise patient safety incidents. A weighted-random sample of 12 500 incidents describing no harm, low harm and moderate harm of patients, and all incidents describing severe harm and death of patients will be classified. Insights from exploratory descriptive statistics and thematic analysis will be combined to identify priority areas for future interventions. The need for ethical approval was waivered by the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board research risk review committee given the anonymised nature of data (ABHB R&D Ref number: SA/410/13). The authors will submit the results of the study to relevant journals and undertake national and international oral presentations to researchers, clinicians and policymakers.
Education Based Publications

What Good is Polarizing Research into Qualitative and Quantitative?

Ercikan, Kadriye & Roth, Wolff-Michael (2006)

Educational Researcher, 352(5), 12-23

The authors argue against a polarization between qualitative and quantitative methods and the associated polarization between “subjective” and “objective” evidence. In doing so, they encourage an understanding of the meaninglessness of such a distinction and the value of taking a more integrated approach. Finally, they map a more “continuous” perspective to addressing the needs of a particular research question and the study design and methodological decisions that follow.
Education Based Publications

Interobserver Agreement, Reliability, and Generalizability of Data Collected in Observational Studies

Mitchell, Sandra K. (1979)

Psychological Bulletin, 86(2): 376-390

Research in developmental and educational psychology has come to rely less on conventional psychometric tests and more on records of behavior made by human observers in natural and quasi-natural settings. Discusses reliability and generalizability in terms of coefficients that reflect the "quality" of data, what defines quality data, and how reports of agreement are insufficient.
Education Based Publications

Advanced Mixed Methods Research Design

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2002)

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publication, In A. Tahakkori and C. Teddlie (Eds), Handbook of Mixed Methods Research Designs, pp. 209-239

Describes variety of mixed methods research designs and associated analytical issues. Related work: Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach Nancy L. Leech, Amy B. Dellinger, Kim B. Brannagan and Hideyuki Tanaka4 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are evaluated. The three mixed research studies differed in design and implementation. Elements of the VF were examined and evaluated for each study, and a picture of the quality of each study was captured textually. In presenting the VF and its potential for practical application in evaluating mixed research studies, pragmatic researchers can use this tool to increase the quality of their evaluations of mixed research studies. Implementing Quality Criteria in Designing and Conducting a Sequential QUAN → QUAL Mixed Methods Study of Student Engagement With Learning Applied Research Methods Online Nataliya V. Ivankova In spite of recent methodological developments related to quality assurance in mixed methods research, practical examples of how to implement quality criteria in designing and conducting sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods studies to ensure the process is systematic and rigorous remain scarce. This article discusses a three-step procedure for securing the quality of the meta-inferences generated from sequential employment of quantitative and qualitative methods and offers several validation strategies specific to a sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods design: applying a systematic process for selecting participants for qualitative follow-up, elaborating on unexpected quantitative results, and observing interaction between qualitative and quantitative study strands. The discussed procedures are illustrated using a mixed methods study of graduate student engagement in learning applied research methods online.
Education Based Publications

Validity and Reliability of Qualitative Data Analysis: Interobserver Agreement in Reconstructing Interpretative Frames

Moret, Margriet, Reuzel, Rob, Van Der Wilt, Gert J. & Grin, John (2007)

Field Methods, 19(1): 24-39

Many authors have discussed criteria for assessing the quality of qualitative and mixed methods studies in the social sciences. However, relatively few have presented the results of using criteria for validity of qualitative studies. We investigated the quality of reconstructing interpretative frames, a method for analyzing interview transcripts. The aim of this method is to describe a person's perspective, distinguishing between perceived problem definitions, proposed solutions, empirical background theories, and normative preferences. Based on this description, one should be able to estimate this person's cooperation on implementing specific changes in his or her practice. In this article, we assessed the interobserver reliability of this analytical method as an indicator of its rigor. Six analysts reconstructed interpretative frames on the basis of verbatim transcripts of three interviews. The analysts agreed only moderately about the issues identified and which problems should be prioritized. However, they showed remarkable unanimity as to the estimates of the respondents' cooperation on proposed solutions.
Education Based Publications

Harnessing experience: exploring the gap between evidence-based medicine and clinical practice

M. Cameron Hay, et all (2008)

Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice

Harnessing experience: exploring the gap between evidence-based medicine and clinical practice
Sociology Based Publications

Dimensions of Desire: Bridging Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in a Study of Female Adolescent Sexuality

Tolman, Deborah L. & Szalacha, Laura A. (1999)

Psychology of Women Quarterly, 23: 7-39

This study provides an example of how feminist psychology can bridge qualitative and quantitative methods while keeping lived experience at the center of an inquiry. Illustrates how feminist psychology research can bridge qual and quant methods while keeping lived experience as the center of inquiry. A qualitative analyis of interview data is distinguised via quant methods to explore differences in urban and suburban experiences with respect to reported sexual violation. A second qual approach more deeply explores the interaction of location reported violation.
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