Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Sociology Based Publications

Systematic Field Observation

McCall, George J. (1984)

Annual Review of Sociology, 10: 263-282

Discusses the history and types of field observation methods from a sociological perspective. Offers a role-expectations view of observation systems requiring a reconceptualization of system development and the nature, sources, and management of error.
Geography Based Publications

Approaches to sampling and case selection in qualitative research: examples in the geography of health

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wil' Smith, Glenn; Washburn, Sarah (2000)

This paper focuses on the question of sampling (or selection of cases) in qualitative research. Although the literature includes some very useful discussions of qualitative sampling strategies, the question of sampling often seems to receive less attention in methodological discussion than questions of how data is collected or is analysed. Decisions about sampling are likely to be important in many qualitative studies (although it may not be an issue in some research). There are varying accounts of the principles applicable to sampling or case selection. Those who espouse ‘theoretical sampling’, based on a ‘grounded theory’ approach, are in some ways opposed to those who promote forms of ‘purposive sampling’ suitable for research informed by an existing body of social theory. Diversity also results from the many different methods for drawing purposive samples which are applicable to qualitative research. We explore the value of a framework suggested by Miles and Huberman [Miles, M., Huberman,, A., 1994. Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage, London.], to evaluate the sampling strategies employed in three examples of research by the authors. Our examples comprise three studies which respectively involve selection of: ‘healing places’; rural places which incorporated national anti-malarial policies; young male interviewees, identified as either chronically ill or disabled. The examples are used to show how in these three studies the (sometimes conflicting) requirements of the different criteria were resolved, as well as the potential and constraints placed on the research by the selection decisions which were made. We also consider how far the criteria Miles and Huberman suggest seem helpful for planning ‘sample’ selection in qualitative research.
Medical Based Publications

A Guide to the Use of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in Assessing Intervention Effects: The Promise of Multiple Methods

Grissmer, D. W., Subotnik, R. F., & Orland, M. (2008)

American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.

This narrative and the accompanying chart (see insert at the end of this report) take the reader through the lifecycle of a research study on the effects and effectiveness of a social intervention. The narrative and chart are intended for instructional use by new researchers, as well as to assist consumers of education research such as policymakers and school leaders contracting research and evaluation work. The narrative and chart had their origins in a December 2004 national forum on incorporating multiple social science research methods in conjunction with randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in education. The National Research Council hosted this forum in collaboration with the American Psychological Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Science Foundation. Its underlying premise was that the contribution of RCTs to research, policy, and practice could be greatly enhanced when multiple methods are used to help understand the effects of context, population, resource constraints, and generalizability of research findings.
Education Based Publications

Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

Lieber, Eli (2009)

UCLA

Education Based Publications

Finding Dignity in Dirty Work

Clare, Stacey (2005)

Sociology of Health and Illness

The aging of the population in the U.S. and elsewhere raises important questions about who will provide long-term care for the elderly and disabled. Current projections indicate that home care workers—most of whom are unskilled, untrained and underpaid—will increasingly absorb responsibility for care. While research to-date confirms the demanding aspects of the work and the need for improved working conditions, little is known about how home care workers themselves experience and negotiate their labour on a daily basis. This paper attempts to address this gap by examining how home care workers assign meaning to their “dirty work.” Qualitative interviews suggest that home care workers have conflicted, often contradictory, relationship to their labour. Workers identify constraints that compromise their ability to do a good job or to experience their work as meaningful, but they also report several rewards that come from caring for dependent adults. I suggest workers draw dignity from these rewards, especially workers who enter home care after fleeing an alienating service job, within or outside of the healthcare industry.
Sociology Based Publications

Content Analysis of Words in Brief Descriptions: How Mothers and Fathers Describe their Children

Ryan, Gery, & Weisner, Thomas S. (1998)

V. de Munck and E. Sobo (Eds.), Using methods in the field. A practical introduction and casebook, pp. 57-68

Content analysis of parent descriptions of their children toward understanding parental perceptions and attitudes regarding their adolescent children. The data for this article comes from a follow-up survey in the Family Lifestyles Project - a 20-year long longitudinal study of conventional and non-conventional families in the United States.
Education Based Publications

Behavior Sampling and Ethnography: Complementary Methods for Understanding Home-School Connections Among Latino Immigrant Families

Weisner, T. S., Ryan, G., Reese, L., Kroesen, K., Bernheimer, L., and Gallimore, R. (2001)

Field Methods, 13(1): 20-46

Used ethnography and experience-sampling methods to study the relations between home activities and school achievement in a sample of low-income Latino immigrant families and their 10-11 year-old children at risk for low school achievement. Both ethnography and experience-sampling methods (ESMs) are effective for assessing children’s home activities. The authors combined them to examine home activities that were school-like, complementary to school, or unrelated to school.
Education Based Publications

Doing Qualitative Research - A Comprehensive Guide

Silverman, David & Marvasti, Amir (2008)

Sage Publications

Research students still lack a singly authored, hands-on, practical guide to the business of doing qualitative research, writing it up, and making use of it. This is what this book sets out to do. Much more than other methodology tens, it aims to teach the skills of qualitative research in the context of the practical problems that face the novice researcher. To this end, it combines telling examples of students' experiences in the field, case studies of relevant qualitative research, summaries of key skills, and exercises to test your knowledge.
Sociology Based Publications

Using Consensus Analysis to Measure Cultural Diversity in Organizations and Social Movements

Caulkins, Douglas & Hyatt, Susan B. (1999)

Field Methods, 11(1): 55-26

Introduces consensus analysis as useful technique for analyzing structured interview data and producing results that: a) measure the degree of agreement amont informants, b) identify "culturally correct" information, and c) assign scores for each informant on how knowledgeble they are with respect to the "correct" response.
Education Based Publications

Logistic Regression

Garson, G. David (2008)

www2.chass.ncsu.edu/garson?PA765/logistic.htm

Overview and how-to guide for specifying and interpreting the results of logistic regression. Logistic regression can be used to predict a dependent variable on the basis of continuous and/or categorical independents and to determine the percent of variance in the dependent variable • explained by the independents; to rank the relative importance of independents; to assess interaction effects; and to understand the impact of covariate control variables. Logistic regression applies maximum likelihood estimation after transforming the dependent into a logit variable (the natural log of the odds of the dependent occurring or not). In this way, logistic regression estimates the probability of a certain event occurring. Note that logistic regression calculates changes in the log odds of the dependent, not changes in the dependent itself as OLS regression does.
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