Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Designing Qualitative Studies

Patton, Michael Quinn (2001)

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, In Michael Quinn Patton, Qualitative Research & Evaluation Methods, 3rd edition, pp.209-257

Practical guide to study design with good attention to taxonomy of research approaches by purpose and sampling issues.
Policy Based Publications

Higher Ground: New Hope for the Working Poor and Their Children

Duncan, Greg, Huston, Aletha, & Weisner, Thomas (2007)

New York: Russell Sage Foundation

During the 1990s, growing demands to end chronic welfare dependency culminated in the 1996 federal “welfare-to-work” reforms. But regardless of welfare reform, the United States has always been home to a large population of working poor—people who remain poor even when they work and do not receive welfare. In a concentrated effort to address the problems of the working poor, a coalition of community activists and business leaders in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, launched New Hope, an experimental program that boosted employment among the city’s poor while reducing poverty and improving children’s lives. In Higher Ground, Greg Duncan, Aletha Huston, and Thomas Weisner provide a compelling look at how New Hope can serve as a model for national anti-poverty policies via their qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method research approaches. New Hope was a social contract—not a welfare program—in which participants were required to work a minimum of thirty hours a week in order to be eligible for earnings supplements and health and child care subsidies. All participants had access to career counseling and temporary community service jobs. Drawing on evidence from surveys, public records of employment and earnings, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observation, Higher Ground tells the story of this ambitious three-year social experiment and evaluates how participants fared relative to a control group. The results were highly encouraging. Poverty rates declined among families that participated in the program. Employment and earnings increased among participants who were not initially working full-time, relative to their counterparts in a control group. For those who had faced just one significant barrier to employment (such as a lack of access to child care or a spotty employment history), these gains lasted years after the program ended. Increased income, combined with New Hope’s subsidies for child care and health care, brought marked improvements to the well-being and development of participants’ children. Enrollment in child care centers increased, and fewer medical needs went unmet. Children performed better in school and exhibited fewer behavioral problems, and gains were particularly dramatic for boys, who are at the greatest risk for poor academic performance and behavioral disorders. As America takes stock of the successes and shortcomings of the Clinton-era welfare reforms, the authors convincingly demonstrate why New Hope could be a model for state and national policies to assist the working poor. Evidence based and insightfully written, Higher Ground illuminates how policymakers can make work pay for families struggling to escape poverty.
Policy Based Publications

Impacts of Children with Troubles on Working Poor Families: Experimental and Mixed Methods Evidence

Bernheimer, L., Weisner, T.S., & Lowe, E. (2003)

Mental Retardation, 41(6): 403-419

Mixed-method and experimental data on working poor families and children with troubles participating in the New Hope anti-poverty experimental initiative in Milwaukee are described. Sixty percent of these families had at least one child who had significant problems (learning, school achievement and/or behavior, home behavior, retardation, other disabilities). Control group familieswith children who had troubles had more difficulties in sustaining their family routine than did New Hope experimental families.
Education Based Publications

Focus Groups

Morgan, David L. (2004)

S. N. Hesse-Biber and P. Leavy (Eds.), Approaches to Qualitative Research: A Reader on Theory and Practice, pp. 263-285. New York, NY: Oxford University Press

Written a long-time authority on focus group, presents a brief history of focus group application up to, and including, information on the variety of current uses across many disciplines. Great section on the uses of focus groups in combination with other methods with a full compare/contrast discussion. Finally, goes into the specifics on ‘how to’ plan and conduct effective group data collection.
Education Based Publications

Unleashing Frankenstein’s Monster? The Use of Computers in Qualitative Research.

Hesse-Biber, Sharlene (2004)

H. R. Bernard (Ed.), Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology, pp. 549-593. In S. N. Hesse-Biber and P. Leavy (Eds.), Approaches to Qualitative Research: A Reader on Theory and Practice, pp. 535-545.

The use of qualitative data analysis software has been increasing in recent years. A number of qualitative researchers have raised questions concerning the effect of such software in the research process. Fears have been expressed that the use of the computer for qualitative analysis may interfere with the relationship between the researcher and the research process itself by distancing the researcher from both the data and the respondent. Others have suggested that the use of a quantitative tool, the computer, would lead to data dredging, quantification of results, and loss of the "art" of qualitative analysis. In this study of 12 qualitative researchers, including both faculty members and graduate students, we have found that these fears are exaggerated. Users of qualitative data analysis software in most cases use the computer as an organizational, time-saving tool and take special care to maintain close relationships with both the data and the respondents. It is an open question, however, whether or not the amount of time and effort saved by the computer enhance research creativity. The research findings are mixed in this area. At issue is the distinction between creativity and productivity when computer methods are used. Computer packages targeted at qualitative and mixed methods researcg data are readily available and the methodology sections of research articles indicate that they are being utilised by some health researchers. The purpose of this article is to draw together concerns which have been expressed by researchers and critics and to place these within the perspective of 'framing' (MacLachlan & Reid, 1994). Here, the focus becomes the frame that these computer programs impose on qualitative data. Inevitably, all data sets are disturbed by the techniques of collection and the conceptual and theoretical frames imposed, but computer framing not only distorts physically but also imposes an often minimally acknowledged frame constructed by the metaphors and implicit ideology of the program. This frame is in opposition to most of the recent changes in qualitative data interpretation, which have emphasised context, thick description and exposure of the minimally disturbed voices of participants.
Education Based Publications

Scientific Foundations of Qualitative Research

Ragin, Charles C., Nagel, Joane, & White, Patricia (2004)

National Science Foundation Report

Report generated by a NSF workshop on qualitative research methods. Two main sections: 1) provide a general guidance for developing qualitative research project and 2) recommendations for strengthening qualitative research. This report is organized into two major sections — general guidance for developing qualitative research projects and recommendations for strengthening qualitative research. The intent of the first section of the report is to serve as a primer to guide both investigators developing qualitative proposals and reviewers evaluating qualitative research projects. The second section of the report presents workshop recommendations for designing, evaluating, supporting, and strengthening qualitative research.
Education Based Publications

Interobserver Agreement, Reliability, and Generalizability of Data Collected in Observational Studies

Mitchell, Sandra K. (1979)

Psychological Bulletin, 86(2): 376-390

Research in developmental and educational psychology has come to rely less on conventional psychometric tests and more on records of behavior made by human observers in natural and quasi-natural settings. Discusses reliability and generalizability in terms of coefficients that reflect the "quality" of data, what defines quality data, and how reports of agreement are insufficient.
Education Based Publications

Mixed Methods Analysis and Information Visualization: Graphical Display for Effective Communication of Research Results

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Dickinson, W. B. (2008)

The Qualitative Report, 13(2), 204-225

Introduces a range of graphical methods that can be used to present mixed methods research results. Presents a taxonomy for the presentation of results in general (quan or qual) and then strategy for integrating qual-quant results in same framework. Frist, we present a broad taxonomy of visual representation. Next, we use this taxonomy to provide and overview of visual techniques for quantitative data display and qualitative data display. Then, we propose what we call "crossover" visual extensions to summarize and integrate both qualitative and quantitative results within the same framework.
Education Based Publications

Advanced Mixed Methods Research Design

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2002)

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publication, In A. Tahakkori and C. Teddlie (Eds), Handbook of Mixed Methods Research Designs, pp. 209-239

Describes variety of mixed methods research designs and associated analytical issues. Related work: Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach Nancy L. Leech, Amy B. Dellinger, Kim B. Brannagan and Hideyuki Tanaka4 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are evaluated. The three mixed research studies differed in design and implementation. Elements of the VF were examined and evaluated for each study, and a picture of the quality of each study was captured textually. In presenting the VF and its potential for practical application in evaluating mixed research studies, pragmatic researchers can use this tool to increase the quality of their evaluations of mixed research studies. Implementing Quality Criteria in Designing and Conducting a Sequential QUAN → QUAL Mixed Methods Study of Student Engagement With Learning Applied Research Methods Online Nataliya V. Ivankova In spite of recent methodological developments related to quality assurance in mixed methods research, practical examples of how to implement quality criteria in designing and conducting sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods studies to ensure the process is systematic and rigorous remain scarce. This article discusses a three-step procedure for securing the quality of the meta-inferences generated from sequential employment of quantitative and qualitative methods and offers several validation strategies specific to a sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods design: applying a systematic process for selecting participants for qualitative follow-up, elaborating on unexpected quantitative results, and observing interaction between qualitative and quantitative study strands. The discussed procedures are illustrated using a mixed methods study of graduate student engagement in learning applied research methods online.
Education Based Publications

Validity and Reliability of Qualitative Data Analysis: Interobserver Agreement in Reconstructing Interpretative Frames

Moret, Margriet, Reuzel, Rob, Van Der Wilt, Gert J. & Grin, John (2007)

Field Methods, 19(1): 24-39

Many authors have discussed criteria for assessing the quality of qualitative and mixed methods studies in the social sciences. However, relatively few have presented the results of using criteria for validity of qualitative studies. We investigated the quality of reconstructing interpretative frames, a method for analyzing interview transcripts. The aim of this method is to describe a person's perspective, distinguishing between perceived problem definitions, proposed solutions, empirical background theories, and normative preferences. Based on this description, one should be able to estimate this person's cooperation on implementing specific changes in his or her practice. In this article, we assessed the interobserver reliability of this analytical method as an indicator of its rigor. Six analysts reconstructed interpretative frames on the basis of verbatim transcripts of three interviews. The analysts agreed only moderately about the issues identified and which problems should be prioritized. However, they showed remarkable unanimity as to the estimates of the respondents' cooperation on proposed solutions.
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