Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Mixed Methods Analysis and Information Visualization: Graphical Display for Effective Communication of Research Results

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Dickinson, W. B. (2008)

The Qualitative Report, 13(2), 204-225

Introduces a range of graphical methods that can be used to present mixed methods research results. Presents a taxonomy for the presentation of results in general (quan or qual) and then strategy for integrating qual-quant results in same framework. Frist, we present a broad taxonomy of visual representation. Next, we use this taxonomy to provide and overview of visual techniques for quantitative data display and qualitative data display. Then, we propose what we call "crossover" visual extensions to summarize and integrate both qualitative and quantitative results within the same framework.
Education Based Publications

Advanced Mixed Methods Research Design

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2002)

Thousand Oaks: Sage Publication, In A. Tahakkori and C. Teddlie (Eds), Handbook of Mixed Methods Research Designs, pp. 209-239

Describes variety of mixed methods research designs and associated analytical issues. Related work: Evaluating Mixed Research Studies: A Mixed Methods Approach Nancy L. Leech, Amy B. Dellinger, Kim B. Brannagan and Hideyuki Tanaka4 The purpose of this article is to demonstrate application of a new framework, the validation framework (VF), to assist researchers in evaluating mixed research studies. Based on an earlier work by Dellinger and Leech, a description of the VF is delineated. Using the VF, three studies from education, health care, and counseling fields are evaluated. The three mixed research studies differed in design and implementation. Elements of the VF were examined and evaluated for each study, and a picture of the quality of each study was captured textually. In presenting the VF and its potential for practical application in evaluating mixed research studies, pragmatic researchers can use this tool to increase the quality of their evaluations of mixed research studies. Implementing Quality Criteria in Designing and Conducting a Sequential QUAN → QUAL Mixed Methods Study of Student Engagement With Learning Applied Research Methods Online Nataliya V. Ivankova In spite of recent methodological developments related to quality assurance in mixed methods research, practical examples of how to implement quality criteria in designing and conducting sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods studies to ensure the process is systematic and rigorous remain scarce. This article discusses a three-step procedure for securing the quality of the meta-inferences generated from sequential employment of quantitative and qualitative methods and offers several validation strategies specific to a sequential QUAN → QUAL mixed methods design: applying a systematic process for selecting participants for qualitative follow-up, elaborating on unexpected quantitative results, and observing interaction between qualitative and quantitative study strands. The discussed procedures are illustrated using a mixed methods study of graduate student engagement in learning applied research methods online.
Education Based Publications

Validity and Reliability of Qualitative Data Analysis: Interobserver Agreement in Reconstructing Interpretative Frames

Moret, Margriet, Reuzel, Rob, Van Der Wilt, Gert J. & Grin, John (2007)

Field Methods, 19(1): 24-39

Many authors have discussed criteria for assessing the quality of qualitative and mixed methods studies in the social sciences. However, relatively few have presented the results of using criteria for validity of qualitative studies. We investigated the quality of reconstructing interpretative frames, a method for analyzing interview transcripts. The aim of this method is to describe a person's perspective, distinguishing between perceived problem definitions, proposed solutions, empirical background theories, and normative preferences. Based on this description, one should be able to estimate this person's cooperation on implementing specific changes in his or her practice. In this article, we assessed the interobserver reliability of this analytical method as an indicator of its rigor. Six analysts reconstructed interpretative frames on the basis of verbatim transcripts of three interviews. The analysts agreed only moderately about the issues identified and which problems should be prioritized. However, they showed remarkable unanimity as to the estimates of the respondents' cooperation on proposed solutions.
Education Based Publications

Foundations of Mixed Methods Research: Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches in the Social andBehavioral Sciences

Teddlie, C., & Tashakkori, A. (2009)

Los Angeles: Sage

Excellent textbook written to be the primary text for a course on mixed methods research
Education Based Publications

Distinguishing the Trees from the Forest: Applying Cluster Analysis to Thematic Qualitative Data

Guest, Greg & McLellan, Eleanor (2003)

Field Methods, 15(2): 186-201

Qualitative data analysis requires organizing and synthesizing often large quantities of text. In many cases, this analysis entails negotiating the interplay between raw data, semantic themes or codes, and the overarching conceptual framework. In this article, the authors use a case study, which examines HIV vaccine efficacy trial participants' discourse, to demonstrate how cluster analysis can be used to aid in the analysis of large qualitative data sets. After briefly reviewing the systematic approaches to qualitative analysis and describing the project background, the authors present an example of how a hierarchical cluster technique can be incorporated into a multistage thematic analysis. Cited by Macia In this article I discuss cluster analysis as an exploratory tool to support the identification of associations within qualitative data. While not appropriate for all qualitative projects, cluster analysis can be particularly helpful in identifying patterns where numerous cases are studied. I use as illustration a research project on Latino grievances to offer a detailed explanation of the main steps in cluster analysis, providing specific considerations for its use with qualitative data. I specifically describe the issues of data transformation, the choice of clustering methods and similarity measures, the identification of a cluster solution, and the interpretation of the data in a qualitative context. Keywords: Cluster Analysis, Qualitative Analysis, Data Exploration, Mixed
Education Based Publications

Techniques to Identify Themes

W., & Bernard, H. Russell (2003)

Field Methods, 15(1): 85-109

Theme identification is one of the most fundamental tasks in qualitative research. It also is one of the most mysterious. Explicit descriptions of theme discovery are rarely found in articles and reports, and when they are, they are often relegated to appendices or footnotes. Techniques are shared among small groups of social scientists, but sharing is impeded by disciplinary or epistemological boundaries. This is a wonderful guide to describing and identifying themes in qualitative research.
Geography Based Publications

Approaches to sampling and case selection in qualitative research: examples in the geography of health

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wil' Smith, Glenn; Washburn, Sarah (2000)

This paper focuses on the question of sampling (or selection of cases) in qualitative research. Although the literature includes some very useful discussions of qualitative sampling strategies, the question of sampling often seems to receive less attention in methodological discussion than questions of how data is collected or is analysed. Decisions about sampling are likely to be important in many qualitative studies (although it may not be an issue in some research). There are varying accounts of the principles applicable to sampling or case selection. Those who espouse ‘theoretical sampling’, based on a ‘grounded theory’ approach, are in some ways opposed to those who promote forms of ‘purposive sampling’ suitable for research informed by an existing body of social theory. Diversity also results from the many different methods for drawing purposive samples which are applicable to qualitative research. We explore the value of a framework suggested by Miles and Huberman [Miles, M., Huberman,, A., 1994. Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage, London.], to evaluate the sampling strategies employed in three examples of research by the authors. Our examples comprise three studies which respectively involve selection of: ‘healing places’; rural places which incorporated national anti-malarial policies; young male interviewees, identified as either chronically ill or disabled. The examples are used to show how in these three studies the (sometimes conflicting) requirements of the different criteria were resolved, as well as the potential and constraints placed on the research by the selection decisions which were made. We also consider how far the criteria Miles and Huberman suggest seem helpful for planning ‘sample’ selection in qualitative research.
Education Based Publications

Paradigms Lost and Pragmatism Regained: Methodological Implications of Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods

Morgan, D. L. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(1): 48-76

This article examines several methodological issues associated with combining qualitative and quantitative methods by comparing the increasing interest in this topic with the earlier renewal of interest in qualitative research during the 1980s. Background on the emergence of mixed method research approaches and suggestions for guiding paradigm shift toward 'pragmatic' approaches in social science research.
Education Based Publications

Using Mixed-Methods Sequential Explanatory Design: From Theory to Practice

Ivankova, Nataliya V., Creswell, John W., & Stick, Sheldon L. (2006)

Field Methods, 18(1): 3-20

Discusses procedural issues related to mixed-methods in a sequential (quant then qual) design. Addresses issues of priority, implementation, and mixing in the design and offers practical guidance.
Education Based Publications

Toward a Unified Validation Framework in Mixed Methods Research

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(4), 309-332

Offers a validation framework to guide thinking about validation in mixed methods work. An orientation from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives is used to set the foundation for discussing and thinking about validation issues. To justify the use of this framework, the authors discuss traditional terminology and vailidity criteria for quantitative and qualitative research, as well as present recently recently published validity terminology for mixed methods research.
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