Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Education Based Publications

Formative Study Conducted in Five Countries to Adapt the Community Popular Opinion Leader Intervention

Williams, Lippincott (2007)

Aims to obtain information about the social and cultural factors related to health behaviors influencing HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) transmission in study communities in China, India, Peru, Russia, and Zimbabwe so that the assessment and intervention of the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative HIV/STD Prevention Trial could be adapted appropriately
Education Based Publications

Prepared Patients: Internet Information Seeking by New Rheumatology Patients

Hay, Lieber Et Al (2008)

American College of Rheumatology

Objective: To investigate to what extent and why new rheumatology patients access medical information online prior to first appointments and secondarily to ask whether they discuss information gained from the Internet with physicians.
Education Based Publications

Sampling

Trochin, M. K. (2006)

Introduction and discussion of various sampling approaches
Education Based Publications

Developing Data Analysis

Silverman, David (2005)

Doing Qualitative Research, 2nd Edition (pp. 171-187)

Provides a step-by-step guide to all the questions students ask when beginning their first research project. Silverman demonstrates how to learn the craft of qualitative research by applying knowledge about different methods to actual data. He provides practical advice on key issues such as defining ‘originality’ and narrowing down a topic, keeping a research diary and writing a research report, and presenting research to different audiences.
Education Based Publications

A Framework for the Study

Creswell, John W. (1994)

J. W. Creswell, Research Design: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 1-19.

How do you decide whether to use a qualitative or a quantitative approach for the design of a research study? How do you write up the results of a study for a scholarly journal article or dissertation? This book addresses these issues by providing a guide to major design decisions, such as deciding a paradigm, stating a purpose for the study, identifying the research questions and hypotheses, using theory, and defining and stating the significance of the study. Research Design is aimed at upper division to graduate level research methods courses that are taught to prepare students to plan and write up independent research studies. In the past two decades, research approaches have multiplied to a point at which investigators or inquirers have many choices. For those designing a proposal or plan, I recommend that a general framework be adopted to provide guidance about all facets of the study, from assessing the general philosophical ideas behind the inquiry to the detailed data collection and analysis procedures. Using an extant framework also allows researchers to lodge their plans in ideas well grounded in the literature and recognized by audiences (e.g., faculty committees) that read and support proposals for research. What frameworks exist for designing a proposal? Although different types and terms abound In the literature, I will focus on three: quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches. 'The first has been available to the social and human scientist for years, the second has emerged primarily during the last three or four decades, and the last is new and still developing in form and substance. This chapter introduces the reader to the three approaches to research. I suggest that to understand them, the proposal developer needs to consider three framework elements: philosophical assumptions about what constltutes knowledge claims; general procedures of research called strategies of inquhy and detailed procedures of data collection, analysis, and writing. called methods. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches frame each of these elements differently, and these diefences are identified and discussed in this chapter. 'Then typical scenarios that combine the three elements are advanced, followed by the reasons why one would choose one approach over another in designing a study. 'This discussion will not be a philosophical treatise on the nature of knowledge, but it will provide a practical grounding in some of the philosophical ideas behind research.
Education Based Publications

What Good is Polarizing Research into Qualitative and Quantitative?

Ercikan, Kadriye & Roth, Wolff-Michael (2006)

Educational Researcher, 352(5), 12-23

The authors argue against a polarization between qualitative and quantitative methods and the associated polarization between “subjective” and “objective” evidence. In doing so, they encourage an understanding of the meaninglessness of such a distinction and the value of taking a more integrated approach. Finally, they map a more “continuous” perspective to addressing the needs of a particular research question and the study design and methodological decisions that follow.
Education Based Publications

Interobserver Agreement, Reliability, and Generalizability of Data Collected in Observational Studies

Mitchell, Sandra K. (1979)

Psychological Bulletin, 86(2): 376-390

Research in developmental and educational psychology has come to rely less on conventional psychometric tests and more on records of behavior made by human observers in natural and quasi-natural settings. Discusses reliability and generalizability in terms of coefficients that reflect the "quality" of data, what defines quality data, and how reports of agreement are insufficient.
Education Based Publications

Mixed Methods Analysis and Information Visualization: Graphical Display for Effective Communication of Research Results

Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Dickinson, W. B. (2008)

The Qualitative Report, 13(2), 204-225

Introduces a range of graphical methods that can be used to present mixed methods research results. Presents a taxonomy for the presentation of results in general (quan or qual) and then strategy for integrating qual-quant results in same framework. Frist, we present a broad taxonomy of visual representation. Next, we use this taxonomy to provide and overview of visual techniques for quantitative data display and qualitative data display. Then, we propose what we call "crossover" visual extensions to summarize and integrate both qualitative and quantitative results within the same framework.
Education Based Publications

Text Analysis - Qualitative and Quantitative Methods

H Russell Bernard, Gery W. Ryan (1998)

Education Based Publications

Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Research: How is it Done?

Bryman, Alan (2006)

Qualitative Research, 6(1), 97-113

Draws on a content analysis of methods and design from 232 articles using combined methods. Examine and discusses the rationales provide for employing mixed-methods and whether they correspond to actual practice.
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