Dedoose Publications

PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Geography Based Publications

Approaches to sampling and case selection in qualitative research: examples in the geography of health

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wil' Smith, Glenn; Washburn, Sarah (2000)

This paper focuses on the question of sampling (or selection of cases) in qualitative research. Although the literature includes some very useful discussions of qualitative sampling strategies, the question of sampling often seems to receive less attention in methodological discussion than questions of how data is collected or is analysed. Decisions about sampling are likely to be important in many qualitative studies (although it may not be an issue in some research). There are varying accounts of the principles applicable to sampling or case selection. Those who espouse ‘theoretical sampling’, based on a ‘grounded theory’ approach, are in some ways opposed to those who promote forms of ‘purposive sampling’ suitable for research informed by an existing body of social theory. Diversity also results from the many different methods for drawing purposive samples which are applicable to qualitative research. We explore the value of a framework suggested by Miles and Huberman [Miles, M., Huberman,, A., 1994. Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage, London.], to evaluate the sampling strategies employed in three examples of research by the authors. Our examples comprise three studies which respectively involve selection of: ‘healing places’; rural places which incorporated national anti-malarial policies; young male interviewees, identified as either chronically ill or disabled. The examples are used to show how in these three studies the (sometimes conflicting) requirements of the different criteria were resolved, as well as the potential and constraints placed on the research by the selection decisions which were made. We also consider how far the criteria Miles and Huberman suggest seem helpful for planning ‘sample’ selection in qualitative research.
Education Based Publications

Paradigms Lost and Pragmatism Regained: Methodological Implications of Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods

Morgan, D. L. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(1): 48-76

This article examines several methodological issues associated with combining qualitative and quantitative methods by comparing the increasing interest in this topic with the earlier renewal of interest in qualitative research during the 1980s. Background on the emergence of mixed method research approaches and suggestions for guiding paradigm shift toward 'pragmatic' approaches in social science research.
Education Based Publications

Reasoning with Numbers

Handwerker, W. Penn & Borgatti, Stephen P. (1998)

H. R. Bernard (Ed.), Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology, pp. 549-593. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press.

Presents a comprehensive set of techniques for representing the world through numbers and argues that there are many things to be missed when neglecting these approaches. With a focus on “answering research questions,” the authors weave this presentation into a discussion of perspective and methodological decisions from various fields. Finishes with specific illustrations for many techniques and how the particular approach can move your research forward.
Education Based Publications

Quantitative and Qualitative Inquiry in Educational Research: Is there a paradigmatic difference between them?

Niglas, Katrin (1999)

Paper presented at the European Conference on Educational Research, Lahti, Finland, September 22-25

Discusses the distinctions between qualitative and quantitative methodological approaches in educational research. Seeks to compare and contrast the characteristics and assumptions of these approaches toward dispelling the notion of paradigm ‘wars’ and in the interest of improving the quality of research in education.
Education Based Publications

Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

Lieber, Eli (2009)

UCLA

Education Based Publications

Finding Dignity in Dirty Work

Clare, Stacey (2005)

Sociology of Health and Illness

The aging of the population in the U.S. and elsewhere raises important questions about who will provide long-term care for the elderly and disabled. Current projections indicate that home care workers—most of whom are unskilled, untrained and underpaid—will increasingly absorb responsibility for care. While research to-date confirms the demanding aspects of the work and the need for improved working conditions, little is known about how home care workers themselves experience and negotiate their labour on a daily basis. This paper attempts to address this gap by examining how home care workers assign meaning to their “dirty work.” Qualitative interviews suggest that home care workers have conflicted, often contradictory, relationship to their labour. Workers identify constraints that compromise their ability to do a good job or to experience their work as meaningful, but they also report several rewards that come from caring for dependent adults. I suggest workers draw dignity from these rewards, especially workers who enter home care after fleeing an alienating service job, within or outside of the healthcare industry.
Medical Based Publications

A Guide to the Use of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) in Assessing Intervention Effects: The Promise of Multiple Methods

Grissmer, D. W., Subotnik, R. F., & Orland, M. (2008)

American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.

This narrative and the accompanying chart (see insert at the end of this report) take the reader through the lifecycle of a research study on the effects and effectiveness of a social intervention. The narrative and chart are intended for instructional use by new researchers, as well as to assist consumers of education research such as policymakers and school leaders contracting research and evaluation work. The narrative and chart had their origins in a December 2004 national forum on incorporating multiple social science research methods in conjunction with randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in education. The National Research Council hosted this forum in collaboration with the American Psychological Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the National Science Foundation. Its underlying premise was that the contribution of RCTs to research, policy, and practice could be greatly enhanced when multiple methods are used to help understand the effects of context, population, resource constraints, and generalizability of research findings.
Education Based Publications

Using Mixed-Methods Sequential Explanatory Design: From Theory to Practice

Ivankova, Nataliya V., Creswell, John W., & Stick, Sheldon L. (2006)

Field Methods, 18(1): 3-20

Discusses procedural issues related to mixed-methods in a sequential (quant then qual) design. Addresses issues of priority, implementation, and mixing in the design and offers practical guidance.
Education Based Publications

Toward a Unified Validation Framework in Mixed Methods Research

Dellinger, Amy B. & Leech, Nancy L. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(4), 309-332

Offers a validation framework to guide thinking about validation in mixed methods work. An orientation from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives is used to set the foundation for discussing and thinking about validation issues. To justify the use of this framework, the authors discuss traditional terminology and vailidity criteria for quantitative and qualitative research, as well as present recently recently published validity terminology for mixed methods research.
Education Based Publications

Design and Integration of Ethnography Within an International Behavior Change HIV/Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Trial

Williams, Lippincott (2007)

Aims to use a common ethnographic study protocol across five countries to provide data to confirm social and risk settings and risk behaviors, develop the assessment instruments, tailor the intervention, design a process evaluation of the intervention, and design an understandable informed consent process.
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