Dedoose Publications
PUBLICATIONS

Dedoose has been field-tested and journal-proven by leading academic institutions and market researchers worldwide. Thousands of prominent researchers across the US and abroad have benefited from early versions of Dedoose in their qualitative and mixed methods work and have laid an outstanding publication and report trail along the way.

Geography Based Publications

Qualitative Research and Its Place in Human Geography

Winchester, Hilary P. M.; Rofe, Matthew W. (2010)

This chapter aims first to provide an overview of contemporary qualitative research methods in human geography. The range of methods commonly used in human geography is considered and categorized, together with some of the ways in which those methods are used to provide explanation. Second, the chapter aims to review briefly the context from which qualitative research has developed in human geography. This is achieved by examining changing schools of thought within the discipline, recognizing that changes are messy, overlapping, and coexisting. Third, the chapter aims to link methodological debates to wider theoretical perspectives in geography.
Education Based Publications

Barriers to Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Bryman, A. (2007)

Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(1): 8-22

This article is concerned with the possibility that the development of mixed methods research is being hindered by the tendency that has been observed by some researchers for quantitative and qualitative findings either not to be integrated or to be integrated to only a limited extent. It examines findings from 20 interviews with U.K. social researchers, all of whom are practitioners of mixed methods research. From these interviews, a wide variety of possible barriers to integrating mixed methods findings are presented. Challenges to integrating mixed methods data and strategy for writing mixed methods research articles.
Geography Based Publications

Evaluating Qualitative Research in Social Geography: Establishing ‘Rigour’ in Interview Analysis

Baxter, Jamie; Eyles, John (1997)

A review of 31 empirical and eighteen substantive papers by qualitative social geographers mainly using in-depth interviews reveals little explicit reference to the principle(s) adopted to enhance ‘rigour’ and to ensure meaningful inference. Given the modest explicit discussion of evaluative criteria in these papers, a scheme from evaluation research itself is critically reviewed. A set of evaluation questions derived from this review and their application to an empirical piece of qualitative work frame an argument for a general set of criteria rather than rigid rules for assessing qualitative work. Such criteria can serve as anchor points for qualitative evaluation.
Geography Based Publications

Approaches to sampling and case selection in qualitative research: examples in the geography of health

Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wil' Smith, Glenn; Washburn, Sarah (2000)

This paper focuses on the question of sampling (or selection of cases) in qualitative research. Although the literature includes some very useful discussions of qualitative sampling strategies, the question of sampling often seems to receive less attention in methodological discussion than questions of how data is collected or is analysed. Decisions about sampling are likely to be important in many qualitative studies (although it may not be an issue in some research). There are varying accounts of the principles applicable to sampling or case selection. Those who espouse ‘theoretical sampling’, based on a ‘grounded theory’ approach, are in some ways opposed to those who promote forms of ‘purposive sampling’ suitable for research informed by an existing body of social theory. Diversity also results from the many different methods for drawing purposive samples which are applicable to qualitative research. We explore the value of a framework suggested by Miles and Huberman [Miles, M., Huberman,, A., 1994. Qualitative Data Analysis, Sage, London.], to evaluate the sampling strategies employed in three examples of research by the authors. Our examples comprise three studies which respectively involve selection of: ‘healing places’; rural places which incorporated national anti-malarial policies; young male interviewees, identified as either chronically ill or disabled. The examples are used to show how in these three studies the (sometimes conflicting) requirements of the different criteria were resolved, as well as the potential and constraints placed on the research by the selection decisions which were made. We also consider how far the criteria Miles and Huberman suggest seem helpful for planning ‘sample’ selection in qualitative research.
Sociology Based Publications

The Mixed Methods Reader

Plano Clark, V. L., & Creswell, J. W. (2008)

Los Angeles: Sage

In recent years, researchers have begun to combine quantitative and qualitative approaches within single study research designs. As such, the literature on mixed methods research has grown at a rapid pace. While more methodological books addressing mixed methods are becoming available, the foundational writings of this field are still scattered across diverse disciplines and their wide range of publications outlets, leaving students and researchers at a disadvantage to find the exemplary or model studies to help them understand how to conduct their own mixed methods research. In light of the dispersed nature of the mixed methods literature, The Mixed Methods Reader editors have organized a collection of key methodological mixed methods discussions and exemplar mixed methods research studies in one easy-to-access location. This integrative collection draws from the international literature appearing across diverse research disciplines over the past thirty years. The Mixed Methods Reader is divided into two parts: Part I – Methodological Selections and Part II – Exemplar Research Studies. Part I includes a collection of 14 foundational writings from the mixed methods research literature. These readings convey the overall development and evolution of mixed methods research and address essential topics for researchers new to the field of mixed methods research. These topics include its foundations; design types; implementation issues such as sampling, data analysis, and validity; rhetorical devices for reporting mixed methods studies; and critiques about the current thinking in the field. Part II includes 9 exemplar mixed methods research studies drawn from a range of disciplines and international scholars. The studies were intentionally selected to illustrate four major types of mixed methods designs. As with the methodological chapters, the editors organize the exemplar research studies so that the reader can see a natural progression of the different approaches to conducting mixed methods research. The Mixed Methods Reader, edited by two leading researchers in mixed methods research, offers students and researchers a rich balance of foundational works and exemplary studies across a range of disciplines. This reader is an invaluable primary or supplementary resource for courses that address mixed methods research. Key Features: Each of the 14 foundational readings offers a brief introduction by the editors, discussing the reading's overall importance to mixed methods research and explaining what aspect of the research process is addressed. The foundational readings are organized around the research process to facilitate its use as a text or supplement for research courses emphasizing mixed methods approaches. They cover research design types and purposes, data collection, data analysis, reporting of mixed methods studies, and future directions. Each of the 9 exemplary studies include a brief commentary from the editors, highlighting the noteworthy features of the article. These exemplary studies range in discipline and setting yet focus intently on the research process and the various ways of conducting mixed methods studies. Visual diagrams accompany each exemplary study: These visual diagrams will convey the overall structure and approach used in each of the studies. Discussion questions accompanying each selection further call attention to the key points and help a student or individual researcher to tie together the core concepts presented in the commentaries and articles.
Medical Based Publications

"I speak a different dialect": Teen Explanatory Models of Difference and Disability

Daley, Tamara, & Weisner, Thomas S. (2003)

Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 17(1): 25-48

fter eras of “blaming” parents for their children’s disabilities and relying on biomedical labels as both correct and sufficient to explain and name various conditions, research and practice today recognize the significance of the meaning and understanding of disabilities held by family members and children themselves. What do teens with disabilities believe about their circumstances, and what do they understand to be the causes, correlates, and consequences of their conditions? Elicited explanatory models from adolescents with varied cognitive disabilities and delay to better understand their personal experiences
Geography Based Publications

Re-thinking research on born globals

Coviello, Nicole (2015)

Knight and Cavusgil’s Journal of International Business Studies Decade Award-winning article offers numerous contributions to international business research. As one example, it advances cross-disciplinary conversation about entrepreneurial internationalization. A critical review of their study reveals, however, that certain findings require reinterpretation. This commentary does so, discussing the resultant implications and the question of when it is (in)appropriate to use the term “born global”. Parts of Knight and Cavusgil are then used as a foundation to identify research questions at the level of the firm. Finally, points from Cavusgil and Knight’s retrospective are used to argue that we need greater understanding of the individual(s) that are central to the firm’s internationalization behaviour. Suggestions for research are made by drawing on concepts and theory from the entrepreneurship, innovation and psychology literatures.
Education Based Publications

Intercoder Reliability for Validating Conclusions Drawn from Open-Ended Interview Data

Kurasaki, Karen S. (2000)

Field Methods, 12(3): 179-194

Intercoder reliability is a measure of agreement among multiple coders for how they apply codes to text data. Intercoder reliability can be used as a proxy for the validity of constructs that emerge from the data. Popular methods for establishing intercoder reliability involve presenting predetermined text segments to coders. Using this approach, researchers run the risk of altering meanings by lifting text from its original context, or making interpretations about the length of codable text. This article describes a set of procedures that was used to develop and assess intercoder reliability with free-flowing text data, in which the coders themselves determined the length of codable text segments. Discusses procedures for developing and assessing intercoder reliability with free-flowing text.
Education Based Publications

Research Design Issues for Mixed Method and Mixed Model Studies

Tashakkori, Abbas & Teddlie, Charles (1998)

A. Tashakkori & C. Teddlie, Mixed Methodology: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches, pp. 40-58

Discusses the concept of triangulation from various perspectives and the variety of approaches to implementing mixed methods research. Builds on Patton’s (1990) discussion of ‘mixed form’ design to a broader model in order to develop a taxonomy for distinguishing various mixed method designs and approaches.
Education Based Publications

Moving Up vs. Moving Out: Neighborhood Effects in Housing Mobility Programs

Briggs, Xavier (1997)

Harvard University Press

This article suggests ways to better design, conduct, and interpret evaluations of the effects of housing mobility programs on participants, with emphasis on how to isolate neighborhood effects. It reviews earlier critiques of neighbor-hood effects research and discusses the key assumptions of housing mobility programs—about the benefits of affluent neighbors, the spatial organization of opportunity for the urban poor, and the meanings of "neighborhood" to resi-dents, researchers, and policy makers.
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